COURSE OFFERINGS

MTConnect Standard: Essentials Suite

Build confidence in digital manufacturing and shop floor IT with MTConnect Education Modules. These engaging, instructive, multimedia modules encompass 200 minutes of total learning about MTConnect – a free, XML-based communications standard that is the backbone of the connected shop floor.

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Function Module Skill Level
Device Connectivity Transformative Technology in Manufacturing Beginner
An overview of the current technical landscape in manufacturing, such as digital manufacturing, digital thread, and monitoring.
  An Overview of MTConnect Beginner

A guideline to the basics of the MTConnect standard, including concepts like the diversity of standards in manufacturing, structured and unstructured data, and the building blocks of data collection.

  A Free & Open Standard Beginner

The components of the MTConnect Standard documents.

  Getting Started Guide Intermediate

An examination of the workflow for implementing MTConnect. They will also learn about available resources and software tools, the role of IT and OT, and some details about installation.

  MTConnect Architecture Intermediate

An exploration of MTConnect architecture and major components used to implement the MTConnect standard.

  MTConnect's Document Organization Intermediate

The organization of the Standard’s documents and versions, such as Part 1.0.

  The MTConnect Agent Intermediate

This module covers the MTConnect Agent, an integral component of the communication system.

  A Deeper Look at the MTConnect Agent Intermediate

An examination of equipment metadata and types of information provided in Streaming Data.

  Data Management and Messaging Patterns Advanced

The types of data handled by the Data Management function and the Request/Response Messaging pattern.

  Request/Response Messaging Communications Advanced

A close look at the exchange of information between a client software application and an Agent.

  Information Collection Advanced

A study of data streaming, the Heartbeat Parameter, and the expected behaviour of an MTConnect Agent.

 



MTUniversity Technology Fundamentals Suite

In as little as 2-3 weeks you too can learn 43 machining fundamentals modules. From the basics of machine tools, to cutting tools and workholding plus 5 additional modules including Set-up Reduction, Intro to Robotics, Advanced Lean Metrics, and more.

AMT Member Subscription – 12 Months: $695.00
Non Member Subscription – 12 Months: $795.00

Function Module Skill Level
CNC History and Definition of CNC Beginner

This class outlines the origin of today's CNC machines and explains how modern CNC evolved from its original designs.

  Introduction to CNC Machines Intermediate

Intro to CNC Machines provides a comprehensive introduction to computer numerical control (CNC), which uses numerical data to control a machine. CNC machines rely on a system of three linear and three rotational axes in order to calculate the motion and position of machine components and workpieces. A machine control unit controls and guides the movements of the machine tool. This class also describes PTP positioning, which moves to the end position before the tool begins to cut, and continuous path systems that can move a tool along two or more axes at once and cut during the movement. Additionally, closed-loop systems provide feedback, while open-loop systems do not.CNC machines are used to make a variety of products using a number of different processes. With proper training, a human operator can use CNC machines to make accurate parts with decreased risk of error. After taking this class users should be able to describe common components of CNC machine tools and controls.

  Basics of the CNC Lathe Intermediate

Basics of the CNC Lathe explains the components and functions of both the chucker and bar machine CNC lathe varieties. CNC lathes have spindles that spin workpieces held in chucks or collets. A carriage and cross slide move along ways to position cutting tools against the spinning part. A cutting tool may remove metal from the inside or outside surface. Carbide inserts are the most common cutting tools used in turning operations. Turning centers are also capable of creating holes with the use of drills and reamers. The turret rotates to place the required tool in the cutting position.It is essential for a CNC lathe operator to be familiar with machine basics prior to executing any cutting operation. A trained operator can use a CNC lathe to create precise parts safely and consistently. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the basic functions and general machine components of a CNC lathe.

  Coordinates for the CNC Lathe Intermediate

Coordinates for the CNC Lathe provides an overview of the coordinates used to program cutting operations on CNC lathes or turning centers. It introduces the systems of both Cartesian and polar coordinates and describes how Cartesian axes are used on a CNC lathe. The class describes both how coordinates are used on blueprints and how they are applied as machine movements. This includes concepts such as incremental vs. absolute coordinates, linear and circular interpolation, machine zero, and program zero.Coordinates and axis movements are at the core of operations for a CNC machine. A foundational knowledge of these topics is necessary to understand how and why parts can be successfully made on the CNC lathe or turning center.

  Basics of G Code Intermediate

Basics of G Code Programming provides a comprehensive introduction to G code programming. Programmers use G codes to create part programs, which direct CNC machines to create a part. Part programs consist of blocks, which contain words that are a combination of a letter address and a numerical value. N codes name or title a program block. G codes describe the operation that the machine will perform. X, Y, and Z codes determine the cutting operation location. F and S codes set the feed and speed, T codes signal the correct cutting tool, and M codes complete other miscellaneous functions.Programmers often rely on computer-assisted programming software to efficiently create part programs. However, to create or edit a part program for a CNC machine, a programmer must understand the different codes in G code programming and what they do. After taking this class, users should be able to describe how G code programming is used to create a part program.

Measurement & Part Documentation Basic Measurement Beginner

The class Basic Measurement offers an overview of common gaging and variable inspection tools and methods. Variable inspection takes a specific measurement using common devices such as calipers and micrometers. The sensitivity of the instrument must be greater than the measurement being taken. Both calipers and micrometers are read by finding the alignments in lines on the devices. Gages, such as gage blocks, plug gages, ring gages, and thread gages, reveal whether a dimension is acceptable or unacceptable without a specific quantity. All inspection devices should be properly mastered and maintained to retain accuracy. One of the fundamental activities of any shop is the measurement of part features. Consistent measurement and inspection maintains standardization and ensures that out-of-tolerance parts do not reach customers. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the use and care of common inspection instruments and gages used in the production environment.

  Inspecting with CMMs Advanced

Inspecting with CMMs provides a comprehensive overview of the functions and mechanics of the coordinate measuring machine, or CMM. A CMM’s probe contacts the various features on a workpiece and records their Cartesian coordinate locations with software. CMMs measure using either contact or noncontact methods and can be used in a lab or on the production floor. CMMs use either manual operation, joystick, or DCC to guide components.As long as the operator is trained in its use, the CMM provides high accuracy measurements with minimum human influence in a very short amount of time. This allows the operator to respond to machining errors and reduce scrap. After this class, users should be able to describe best practices for using the CMM to inspect parts.

  Surface Texture and Inspection Intermediate

The class Surface Texture and Inspection provides information on surface finish and methods involved for its inspection. The surface finish achieved by a machining process determines how well a surface performs its given function. Surface inspection compares the specified nominal surface and real surface to find the measured surface. Measurement can be completed by comparison, direct measurement with a stylus-type instrument, or noncontact methods. A real surface contains irregularities (flaws, roughness, waviness, and lay) that make up its surface texture. Roughness is the most common irregularity used to inspect surfaces. The desired finish of a surface changes how precisely a part must be machined. Inspecting for surface roughness reduces the cost of surface finish by allowing companies to produce parts to customer specifications. After the class, users should be able to describe commonly used methods for tolerancing a part's surface roughness in a production environment.

  Introduction to GD&T Advanced

Introduction to GD&T provides a basic introduction to the symbols and vocabulary of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, or GD&T. GD&T is an international design standard that uses 14 standard geometric tolerances to control the shape of features. GD&T emphasizes the fit, form, and function of a part by comparing the physical features of the part to the imaginary datums specified in the design instructions. Every part feature is described by a series of symbols, which are organized in the feature control frame.Because GD&T uses tolerance zones that more accurately follow the shape of a feature rather than a square grid and emphasizes the relationship between features, blueprints usually utilitize GD&T to describe parts. This means that to fully understand a blueprint, it is necessary to know the GD&T symbols and what they mean. After taking this class, users should be able to better understand the symbols commonly used in a GD&T print.

  Basics of Tolerance Beginner

Basics of Tolerance provides a comprehensive overview on part tolerancing, including different types of tolerances and the relationship between tolerances and part dimensions. Every manufactured part must meet certain specifications. Tolerances describe the range of acceptable measurements in which a part can still perform its intended function. Tolerance ranges typically describe a linear measurement. Surface texture can require a certain tolerance as well. Tolerances attempt to balance the use of a product with the cost required to produce that product.Improper tolerancing can result in parts that do not function in the way they were intended or parts produced with dimensions that are more precise than necessary, adding unwanted cost to production. After the class, users will be able to describe common methods used for part tolerancing, as well as the impact tolerances have on part production and quality.

  Blueprint Reading Beginner

The class Blueprint Reading provides a thorough understanding of blueprints and how to read them. Blueprints are documents that contain three major elements: the drawing, dimensions, and notes. The drawing illustrates the views of the part necessary to show its features. Together, the extension and dimension lines on the drawing indicate dimensions and specific tolerance information of each feature. The notes contain administrative and global information about the part. A blueprint contains all instructions and requirements necessary to manufacture and inspect a part.An understanding of how to read a blueprint is critical to manufacture and inspect parts to accurate specifications. Accurate blueprint creation helps to ensure that finished parts will function in a way that meets the original intent. After taking this class, users should be able to read a basic blueprint and determine the critical features on a part that need to be measured.

  Units of Measurement Beginner

The class Units of Measurement provides a thorough explanation of the English and Metric systems and how conversion between them occurs. The common base units of measurement are length, area, volume, mass, and temperature. The English system uses inches, feet, yards, and miles to measure length, while the Metric system uses the meter, millimeter, centimeter, and kilometer. Metric conversion requires simply knowing the equivalent number of units and moving the decimal point accordingly. When converting between Metric and English units, use a reference chart, multiply, or divide, depending on the conversion. Units of measurement are used every day in a production environment. Converting between units is often required, especially for businesses dealing internationally. After taking this class, users should be able to perform calculations involving common English units, metric units, and conversions between the two systems.

Materials Introduction to Physical Properties Beginner

Intro to Physical Properties provides an overview of manufacturing materials and their physical properties, including thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties. This class also introduces users to volumetric characteristics, such as mass, weight, and density. Physical properties determine how a material will react to moisture, heat, electricity, and other factors. In order to choose the best tooling or raw material for an application, manufacturers must understand the physical properties of key metals, plastics, and other materials. After taking this course, users will be able to identify and describe key physical properties and their value in a manufacturing setting.

  Introduction to Mechanical Properties Beginner

Intro to Mechanical Properties provides a thorough introduction to key mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, hardness, ductility, and impact resistance. This class discusses how shear, compression, and tensile stress impact a material's properties, how force is shown on a stress-strain graph, and common methods manufacturers use to test a material's strength. To make quality products, manufacturers must anticipate how a material responds to shaping and cutting forces and understand how that material will ultimately function once it reaches the customer. Evaluating a material's mechanical and physical properties is the first step to choosing reliable tooling and processing methods. After taking Intro to Mechanical Properties, users will know more about hardness, ductility, and strength, what materials exhibit these characteristics, and common methods a facility might use to test these qualities.

  Classification of Steel Beginner

Classification of Steel introduces users to steel designations systems, particularly AISI-SAE and UNS methods. This class describes classifications for plain carbon, alloy, high-strength low alloy, stainless, and tool steels, with a focus on AISI-SAE designations. There are many different types of steels, each having unique chemical contents and properties. Manufacturers distinguish between these metals by a numerical designation. In the AISI-SAE system, this number indicates the family of steel and the steel's carbon content. Some designations also describe the metal's intended use or special properties. Because composition and processing methods determine a metal's properties, understanding steel classification is critical to choosing the best material for an application. After this class, users will be able to distinguish between major types of steel classifications and describe the nomenclature used to identify various grades of steel.

Workholding Introduction to Workholding Beginner

"Introduction to Workholding" describes the purpose of workholding, basic workholding devices, and how workholding devices are used. Workholding devices are used to locate, support, and secure workpieces for a variety of manufacturing operations, including machining, welding, and assembly. Common workholding devices include chucks, collets, vises, jigs, and fixtures. These common devices are used for the majority of workholding in a wide range of applications.Workholding is one of the most important aspects of a number of manufacturing operations. Having operators who understand how to use the various workholding devices is essential for efficient, safe, and high-quality part production. Proper use of workholding improves production speed as well as part tolerance and finish. After taking this class, users will be able to explain the purpose of workholding, identify common workholding devices, and describe how to use workholding devices.

  Supporting and Locating Principles Beginner
This class describes the fundamental theory to properly supporting, locating, and clamping a workpiece. Includes an Interactive Lab.
  Chucks, Collets, Vises Beginner
This class identifies the standard workholding devices used for both the mill and the lathe.
  Fixture Body Construction Intermediate
This class discusses common tool body forms and the material and cost considerations associated with their construction.
Safety Electrical Units Beginner
Electrical Units provides a foundational overview of electricity, including fundamental measures and terminology used to discuss electricity. Electricity is the flow of electrons, which are negatively charged particles. The amount of valence electrons in an atom determines how well it allows electricity to flow. There are two types of electricity, alternating current and direct current, but both flow from negative to positive. Current is measured by certain terms, including amperage, voltage, resistance, and wattage. Ohm’s Law and Watt’s Law describe the relationships between these values in a circuit.When working with electrical systems, knowing how electricity flows and what different terms mean is very important. After taking this class, users should be familiar with the fundamentals of electricity and the vocabulary used to describe it. This enables users to build an understanding of more advanced electrical concepts and discuss them with the correct terminology.
  Safety for Electrical Work Beginner
Safety for Electrical Work provides an overview of the risks of working with electricity, as well as safety precautions Electricity can cause shock, burns, and fires. Electric shock occurs when current passes through a person's body. Overheating electrical components can cause burns and fires. To prevent electrical injuries, circuits and components must be properly grounded and maintained and employees must observe lockout/tagout practices and wear the appropriate personal protective equipment.Employees must understand and practice precautionary and preventative measures in order to safely and effectively work with electricity. After completing this course, users will be able to describe the best practices for maintaining safety and preventing injury while working with electrical systems.
  Safety for Metal Cutting Beginner
Safety for Metal Cutting provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin and eye irritation, and machine guarding. Manual machines often require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. CNC machines often have fixed guards, which prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation. Also, operators must handle all sharp-edged tools properly.Awareness of potential safety hazards reduces the risk of operator injury. The key to cutting safety is to follow the proper guidelines for the facility and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment. After taking the class, users should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols in a metal-cutting environment.
Machine & Metalcutting Basic Basic Cutting Theory Intermediate
Basic Cutting Theory provides an introductory overview of metal cutting theory and chip formation. The most fundamental aspect of cutting theory is the use of a cutting tool to remove material in the form of chips. Cutting tools can be divided into single-point tools, commonly used on the lathe, and multi-point tools, commonly used in milling and holemaking. The shape and type of chip created by cutting indicates whether or not cutting conditions are optimized. Adjusting tool angles and cutting variables has the largest effect on chip creation and cutting conditions.Understanding how chips are formed and what factors change or optimize chip formation is essential to performing an effective metal cutting operation. Chip formation affects surface finish, part quality, and tool life, and thus has a large effect on manufacturing economy.
  Forces of Machines Beginner
Forces of Machines provides a comprehensive overview of the physical forces behind machine functions. All machines are based on the science of mechanics, which deals with the effects of different forces that either cause or prevent motion. Understanding the different types of forces, the physical laws that define them, and the ways in which they are measured is crucial to understanding machine functions.Understanding how machines work is essential to working with and performing maintenance upon any type of machinery. This includes the ability to distinguish between contact and non-contact forces, linear and rotary motion, speed and velocity, and scalar and vector quantities, all of which serve as a basis for more advanced mechanical topics. After completing this class, users will be prepared to both work with and study more complex aspects of mechanical systems.
  Cutting Processes Beginner
Cutting Processes provides an introductory overview of the common metal cutting operations. To those new to manufacturing and machining, familiarity with the basic machines, tools, and principles of metal cutting is essential. The class focuses on the most common machining tools, the saw, lathe, and mill, and the common processes performed on each, such as band sawing, turning, end milling, and drilling. Cutting Processes also offers an introduction to holemaking and describes the differences between inner and outer diameter operations.A basic, foundational knowledge of metal cutting processes is essential to gain understanding of more advanced information such as cutting theory, tool and workpiece material, cutting variables, and tool geometries. After taking this class, students should be able to identify the most common cutting processes, as well as the machines used to perform them.
  Overview of Machine Tools Beginner
Overview of Machine Tools provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, including the various types of cutting operations performed and the different types of tools commonly used on both machines.This class provides new users with the foundational information about machine tools and their uses that is necessary for users to gain familiarity with common metal cutting machines and knowledge of metal cutting theory and processes. A basic understanding of the types of machine tools used in metal cutting operations will prepare users for becoming machine operators.
  Lathe Tool Geometry Advanced
Lathe Tool Geometry provides a description of single-point lathe tool angles, detailing the effect these angles have on a cutting operation. Tool angles have a significant impact on a cutting operation, as each angle offers a tradeoff between cutting-edge strength and improved tool service life, among other factors. Cutting tool angles must be optimized to each unique combination of workpiece material, tool material, cutting application, and desired surface finish quality.Improper tool geometry leads to premature tool wear and failure, poor surface finish, and slower speed and feed rates. These factors increase manufacturing costs, create excess waste and scrapped parts, and slow production rates. After taking this course, users will be able to better identify and implement proper tool geometry for lathe cutting processes to improve production efficiency and maximize tool service life.
Manufacturing Strategies Quality Overview Beginner
This class identifies how each department and function of a company plays a role in producing quality products for the customer.
  Lean Manufacturing Overview Beginner
Lean Manufacturing Overview provides an introduction to the principles and terminology of lean strategies, including a discussion of the seven forms of waste, the definition of value-added, the difference between push and pull systems, and the importance of continuous improvement. This class also highlights other quality concepts, such as single minute exchange of dies (SMED), inventory reduction, and Five S.Lean manufacturing approaches help companies optimize their processes through organization and waste reduction. Although change can be a challenge, more efficient, streamlined processes will ultimately lead to improved customer satisfaction. This class outlines the foundational concepts and vocabulary that every practitioner needs when beginning, or continuing, a lean initiative.
  Introduction to Six Sigma Beginner
Intro to Six Sigma provides a comprehensive introduction to the goals, methods, and tools used during Six Sigma initiatives. This class discusses the different roles in a Six Sigma team, DMAIC steps, and how to identify variation. Intro to Six Sigma also covers the tools practitioners use to track and analyze data, such as Pareto charts, frequency distribution charts, and run charts. Unlike some quality initiatives, Six Sigma offers tangible, measurable methods to gage a project's success. This class gives new practitioners the foundational knowledge needed to support a Six Sigma project by introducing them to key terminology and important data analysis tools.
  SPC Overview Intermediate
SPC Overview offers a thorough introduction to the purpose and main concepts of statistical process control (SPC). This class describes different types of control charts, such as X bar, R, and P charts, and how these tools are used to determine if a process is in-control or out-of-control. Identifying and eliminating special cause variation is essential to creating quality products and reducing waste. SPC methods are an efficient, effective means to track variation and monitor processes. With SPC tools, manufacturers have the ability to find and fix issues before they lead to product problems. After taking this course, new and current personnel will understand commonly used control charts and recognize out-of-control signs, making them better equipped to contribute to quality control efforts at their facility.
  Introduction to Abrasives Beginner
This class defines abrasive processes and explains the major groups of abrasive tools.
  Basic Grinding Theory Intermediate
Basic Grinding Theory provides an overview of the general process of grinding . Grinding occurs at the point of contact between an abrasive wheel and a workpiece. Like any other cutting process, grinding removes material in the form of chips. In order for a wheel to grind properly, its abrasive grains must wear and self-sharpen at a consistent rate. Otherwise, wheel problems such as loading and glazing may occur. Truing and dressing wheels and applying grinding fluids can fix or prevent these issues.An understanding of grinding wheels and processes allows operators to perform grinding operations effectively and recognize and address any grinding wheel problems that may occur. This understanding and recognition will improve the accuracy, precision, and overall success of grinding operations, reducing scrap parts and increasing productivity.
  Grinding Processes Intermediate
Grinding Processes provides a comprehensive overview of the various types of grinding used in modern manufacturing environments. Surface, cylindrical, centerless, and internal grinding processes are commonly used for workpieces of various shapes. Surface grinding is further distinguished by whether the table is rotary or reciprocating, and whether the spindle is vertically or horizontally oriented. Cylindrical grinding is distinguished by workholding, whether center-type or chucking-type. Centerless grinding can be either throughfeed or infeed, and internal grinding can be done on a cylindrical or centerless grinder.A foundational knowledge of the different types of grinding, including how they operate and what types of workpieces they are appropriate for, is necessary for any further learning or training in grinding. This class introduces students to the various types of grinding that they may encounter, describing both machine tools and movements.
EDM Introduction to EDM Beginner
This class introduces the process, components and machines of electric discharge machining.
  Electrical Units Beginner
Electrical Units provides a foundational overview of electricity, including fundamental measures and terminology used to discuss electricity. Electricity is the flow of electrons, which are negatively charged particles. The amount of valence electrons in an atom determines how well it allows electricity to flow. There are two types of electricity, alternating current and direct current, but both flow from negative to positive. Current is measured by certain terms, including amperage, voltage, resistance, and wattage. Ohm’s Law and Watt’s Law describe the relationships between these values in a circuit.When working with electrical systems, knowing how electricity flows and what different terms mean is very important. After taking this class, users should be familiar with the fundamentals of electricity and the vocabulary used to describe it. This enables users to build an understanding of more advanced electrical concepts and discuss them with the correct terminology.
  DC Power Sources Intermediate
DC Circuit Components provides a comprehensive overview of the different parts that appear in DC circuits, including source, path, control, and load. DC power sources include batteries, generators, and piezoelectricity. The path of a circuit is made of a conductor, which has low resistance, but other materials with more resistance, such as insulators, semiconductors, and resistors, are often also used in circuits. In general, switches are used to control current, but many circuits also have safety devices, such as fuses and breakers, to protect the circuit from high current conditions.Understanding the purpose of different components is essential for working with DC circuits. After taking this class, users should have a firm grasp of many different circuit components and understand when and why they are used. This knowledge will allow them to design effective circuits and recognize potential problems with a circuit’s components.
 Press Work & Metal Forming   All Skill Levels
  3+Press Basics Beginner
This class introduces common stamping presses, as well as their main components and functions.
  Punch and Die Operations Beginner
This class introduces the common sheet metal operations performed with the help of dies and presses. Includes an Interactive Lab.
  Die Components Beginner
This class introduces dies, their main components and function within a press.
  Press Brake Components Beginner
This class identifies the major components of the press brake and describes the most common press brake designs. Includes an Interactive Lab.

MTUniversity Additive Manufacturing Suite

Additive manufacturing is a process in which a three-dimensional computer model design is built into a physical object by layering material. It is a versatile field that encompasses a variety of methods, materials, and applications. Manufacturers are beginning to recognize the benefits that Additive Manufacturing (AM) offers in terms of speed, simplicity, reliability, and cost. CMTSEs can earn 4 Professional Development Points from taking this suite.

AMT Member Subscription – 12 Months: $325 for Members
Non Member Subscription – 12 Months: $425 for Members

 

Function Module Skill Level
Additive Manufacturing Introduction to Additive Manufacturing Beginner
Introduction to Additive Manufacturing provides an overview of additive manufacturing (AM), including its history, advantages, disadvantages, basic steps, methods, and materials. Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing industry that allows for rapid prototyping and the creation of more complex and functional parts, including end-use parts and traditional manufacturing tooling. AM encompasses a variety of build methods, such as material jetting and material extrusion.An understanding of the AM basics is useful for anyone working in the manufacturing industry. AM methods often streamline manufacturing processes and improve products and profitability. After completing this class, users will have gained important foundational AM knowledge, including the different AM methods and processes, the uses of AM, and the potential for future AM industrial growth.
  Additive Manufacturing Safety Beginner
Additive Manufacturing Safety describes the various safety hazards involved in additive manufacturing (AM) and the precautions operators should follow to protect themselves. AM methods and processes involve the use of moving and hot components, hazardous materials, and devices that produce radiation. Operators must be aware of these hazards as well as the safety protocols used to reduce them. For example, all AM materials have specific handling guidelines, including the required personal protective equipment (PPE) and ventilation for that material.Though many AM safety protocols will be familiar to anyone who has worked in a manufacturing environment, there are also hazards unique to AM. Knowing these hazards and safety precautions will help ensure that an AM operation runs smoothly, efficiently, and safely. After taking this class, users will be able to identify AM hazards, understand common safety standards, and safely operate AM equipment.
  The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process Beginner
The Basic Additive Manufacturing Process discusses the general steps involved in most additive manufacturing (AM) procedures. Important steps include creating 3D computer models, converting those models to AM compatible file formats, setting up and running an AM machine, and part removal and post-processing. The manufacturing industry is progressively finding AM to be an important resource in rapid prototyping and creating end-use parts. Thus, it is increasingly important that engineers and operators understand AM technology and its basic process.Understanding the basic AM process will help engineers and operators more easily learn a specific AM operation's unique considerations and procedures. A basic understanding of AM can also help assess AM's value within a manufacturing operation. After taking this class, users will understand the standard steps involved in any AM process.
  Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials Beginner
Additive Manufacturing Methods and Materials provides a comprehensive introduction to the methods and materials that can be used in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing encompasses a wide range of methods and processes that are constantly evolving as manufacturers continue to make new developments. AM methods include material extrusion, directed energy deposition (DED), material jetting, binder jetting, powder bed fusion (PBF), vat photopolymerization, and sheet lamination. Different AM methods require different materials, and each method provides specific advantages and disadvantages.Understanding each AM method's basic principles, advantages, and disadvantages is essential to ensuring an AM part build's success. After completing this class, users will be able to distinguish between the different AM methods and choose the best AM method for a particular application.
  Design for Additive Manufacturing Beginner
Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) discusses how to conceptualize and create a part design for an additive manufacturing (AM) process. DFAM provides engineers with an incredible degree of freedom. AM processes are capable of creating prototypes or parts with increased complexity, functionality, and integration. AM also allows for other unique manufacturing opportunities, such as mass customization.Though there are some design limitations with DFAM, such as part size and material choice, the process is mainly characterized by the opportunities it provides engineers. After taking this course, users will understand key DFAM concepts, such as functional complexity and hierarchical complexity, the basics of AM production processes, and how DFAM concepts related to basic AM production.
  Additive Manufacturing Materials Science Intermediate
Additive Manufacturing Materials Science provides a comprehensive overview of the materials that can be used with additive manufacturing (AM) processes. AM materials include a variety of polymers, metals, composites, and ceramics. Each material is distinguished from another material by microstructure, mechanical and physical properties, and life cycle. Different AM processes require the use of different AM materials. Therefore, an individual must understand materials’ science to ensure proper material selection.Understanding the materials that are compatible with additive manufacturing processes is an essential part of AM process success. After completing this class, users will not only be able to distinguish between thermoplastic and thermoset polymers, ferrous metals and nonferrous alloys, and ceramic and composite materials, but users will also be able to determine which material type is most appropriate for use with a specific AM process.
  Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing Intermediate
Integrating Additive Manufacturing with Traditional Manufacturing discusses the factors manufacturers should consider when adding an additive manufacturing (AM) component to a traditional manufacturing operation, including cost, logistics, and best uses of AM with traditional manufacturing, among other concerns. Originally used for prototyping, AM has increasingly found more roles in traditional manufacturing processes, such as creating tooling or end-use parts. However, because the procedures and tools are so different, combining the two kinds of manufacturing requires considerable adjustments.Logistical concerns of integrating AM with traditional manufacturing include purchasing the correct machines and updating safety protocols. Design concerns involve upskilling engineers so that they can take full advantage of AM capabilities. After taking this course, users will understand how to take full advantage of AM as a tool to augment a traditional manufacturing operation.
  Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process Beginner
Additive Manufacturing as a Secondary Process provides a comprehensive overview of the way in which manufacturers can use additive manufacturing (AM) as a secondary, or indirect, process. AM methods can make a variety of tooling, such as molds and patterns, for use in several different casting, forming, and molding processes. Using AM as a secondary process benefits traditional manufacturing processes by reducing costs associated with lead time, tooling, and labor. An individual must understand the different advantages and disadvantages associated with AM as a secondary process prior to determining whether or not to utilize it.Knowledge about AM secondary processes and their benefits is important in order to understand the full impact that AM has upon traditional manufacturing. After completing this class, users will be able to identify the traditional manufacturing areas that benefit from using AM as a secondary process and the advantages and disadvantages of doing so.


MTUniversity Quality Suite

The MTUniversity's Quality Suite covers standards, auditing, and improvement for all levels of the shop.

  • 8 modules
  • Vocabulary list
  • Pre-test
  • Final exam
  • CMTSEs can earn 2 Professional Development Points from taking this suite.
AMT Member Subscription – 12 Months: $325 for Members
Non Member Subscription – 12 Months: $450 for Members

Function Module Skill Level
Quality Processes Quality Overview Beginner
This class identifies how each department and function of a company plays a role in producing quality products for the customer.
  Lean Manufacturing Overview Beginner
Lean Manufacturing Overview provides an introduction to the principles and terminology of lean strategies, including a discussion of the seven forms of waste, the definition of value-added, the difference between push and pull systems, and the importance of continuous improvement. This class also highlights other quality concepts, such as single minute exchange of dies (SMED), inventory reduction, and Five S.Lean manufacturing approaches help companies optimize their processes through organization and waste reduction. Although change can be a challenge, more efficient, streamlined processes will ultimately lead to improved customer satisfaction. This class outlines the foundational concepts and vocabulary that every practitioner needs when beginning, or continuing, a lean initiative.
  Intro to Six Sigma Beginner
Intro to Six Sigma provides a comprehensive introduction to the goals, methods, and tools used during Six Sigma initiatives. This class discusses the different roles in a Six Sigma team, DMAIC steps, and how to identify variation. Intro to Six Sigma also covers the tools practitioners use to track and analyze data, such as Pareto charts, frequency distribution charts, and run charts. Unlike some quality initiatives, Six Sigma offers tangible, measurable methods to gage a project's success. This class gives new practitioners the foundational knowledge needed to support a Six Sigma project by introducing them to key terminology and important data analysis tools.
  SPC Overview Intermediate
SPC Overview offers a thorough introduction to the purpose and main concepts of statistical process control (SPC). This class describes different types of control charts, such as X bar, R, and P charts, and how these tools are used to determine if a process is in-control or out-of-control. Identifying and eliminating special cause variation is essential to creating quality products and reducing waste. SPC methods are an efficient, effective means to track variation and monitor processes. With SPC tools, manufacturers have the ability to find and fix issues before they lead to product problems. After taking this course, new and current personnel will understand commonly used control charts and recognize out-of-control signs, making them better equipped to contribute to quality control efforts at their facility.
  Total Productive Maintenance Beginner
Total Productive Maintenance introduces users to TPM concepts and principles. This class provides an overview of each key TPM pillar, including autonomous maintenance, Five S, planned maintenance, quality maintenance, kaizen, training, safety, and office TPM. TPM combines aspects from lean manufacturing and quality initiatives to create a blended maintenance approach for both production and administrative areas. Improved safety, longer machine life, and increased employee involvement are just a few benefits of a well-executed TPM strategy. After taking this course, users will be able to describe the key components of total productive maintenance and their role in continuous improvement.
  Metrics For Lean Intermediate
Metrics for Lean provides an introduction to the information and data used to track processes in lean manufacturing facilities, including takt time, cycle time, total time of operations, overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), and first-time quality. Metrics are measurable variables that can be tracked over time in order to identify errors or gauge progress. In lean facilities, metrics are tools manufacturers use to identify non-value added activities, streamline operations, and improve operations. After taking this class, users will be able to distinguish between broad and narrow metrics and calculate key values such as takt time and OEE. Understanding this information will help users contribute to lean initiatives and everyday continuous improvement efforts.
  Strategies for Setup Reduction Intermediate
The class Strategies for Setup Reduction presents several common strategies for decreasing setup, the activities required to prepare a product for processing. The single minute exchange of dies (SMED) method, which strives to reduce setups to under 10 minutes, is a core approach to setup reduction. SMED focuses on transitioning internal steps to external steps, which can be performed while machines are running. Additional SMED practices include using setup teams in parallel operations and prepping tools, paperwork, and materials. Standardization and special devices like one-turn and one-touch fasteners and intermediate jigs also help reduce setup times. Setup reduction is one of the many goals of lean manufacturing. Reducing setup times allows manufacturers to perform more setups for smaller, more-varied batches so that they can better respond to customer demands. After taking this class, users should be familiar with methods and understand the importance of setup reduction.
  Troubleshooting Beginner
Troubleshooting provides a comprehensive overview of various methods and tools used to troubleshoot problems. Troubleshooting often involves finding the root cause of a problem and being able to distinguish deviations from problems and early warning signs from warning signs. Many tools are used to collect and interpret troubleshooting data, including check sheets, fishbone diagrams, and Pareto charts. The 5 Why technique, brainstorming, documentation, and troubleshooting teams are common methods of gathering troubleshooting data. Troubleshooting teams gather data in order to find possible solutions. Teams must test solutions to make sure they offer long-term results.Troubleshooting is an extremely important skill for all areas of industry. The information provided in this class prepares students to solve problems and understand how to work to prevent them in many different settings. Without this knowledge, students would not be able to solve problems effectively.